Eight places in Anglesey to visit this summer you might not know about


Anglesey, one of the UK’s most popular tourist destinations, is known for its beautiful sandy beaches, quaint little villages and vast stretches of open land. For those just visiting the area, it can be easy to get carried away with the most popular sights the island has to offer.

There’s a lot to explore around the island, but some places might help you beat the crowds, discover something new, and find something different to enjoy.

Below, we’ve listed some of those places to consider. Although all of these sites have a right of way and relatively easy access, please prepare in advance to ensure safe travel at all times. Some tips for safe swimming in open water can be found here.

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Borthwen Beach &Arch Bwa Gwyn



Borthwen Beach.

A unique swimming spot for those looking to get away from the busier beaches, this crescent-shaped bay is dotted with small islets that are ideal for swimmers or paddlers of all kinds. There are also sea arches through which you can sometimes swim, but caution is advised.

Access to the beach is via a long narrow lane which ends in a small car park, get there early if you want the chance to park here, otherwise look towards the car park in the small village or near The White pub Eagle. There are a few options down from there, keep an eye out for signs.

Ynys and Fydlyn



Ynys and Fydlyn
Ynys and Fydlyn

Another unique spot for those looking to get in the water, this offers another sea arch to swim in but only at high tide, as well as a rocky cove to walk around. The place itself is quite small and can get quite tricky depending on the weather, so be sure to check before visiting.

Due to its size you are unlikely to encounter many people here, it also offers scenic walks for people to pass with wonderful sea views. Again limited parking is available, but arrive too late and you may have trouble finding a place to park.

Traeth an Ora Beach

Passing across Anglesey we find a long sandy beach, just beside the sanflats of the River Dulas estuary. At high tide the beach, pictured above, is a mixture of sand and pebbles, but when the tide goes out a long stretch of flat sand is revealed.

It’s not a short hike to reach this location, as the nearest car park is just over a mile away at nearby Lligwy Beach. This long hike, however, means that the beach is generally quiet year-round, making it the perfect spot for a peaceful day of sunbathing and swimming.

South Stack and Holyhead Mountain



South Stack Lighthouse
South Stack Lighthouse

Far from the more secret spots on this list are the bustling, nearby spots of South Stack and Holyhead Mountain. Although better known, these spots are often overlooked for the most popular spots – which is a real shame, because between the crumbling Coastguard Lookout, a perfect sunset vantage point, the lighthouse and a wonderful walk to both, this place has so much to offer.

The place is also renowned for its wildlife with common sites of puffins and seals, and occasional visits by dolphins and porpoises, making it an ideal location for those looking to spot local wildlife. Around the area you can also find impressive circles of Iron Age huts, should you wish to extend your visit.

There is ample parking and easy access, but be sure to come prepared for a long walk. The location is a short distance from Holyhead and the harbor for those traveling to or from Ireland.

Llanddeiniolen yew

Hidden away in St Deiniolen’s graveyard you will find some of the most impressive ancient yew trees you will see across the UK. The church itself replaced an earlier church to the northeast, built in the 19th century.

The yews are said to be over 2000 years old, with a few scattered around the graveyard, one of them can be climbed inside due to the unique way the trees have grown, leaving a large separation at the environment. The place is ideal for a quick visit, with parking about 400 meters away.

Can you think of a better place to visit? Let us know in the comments.

Well of St Gwenfaen, Rhoscolyn



Well of St Gwenfaen
Well of St Gwenfaen

Anglesey is dotted with remnants of bygone eras, but one of the least visited is St Gwenfaen’s Well, a medieval holy house with a well, or at least the remains of one. Steps still lead down to the pool where white quartz pebbles can still be seen, these pebbles are said to have been thrown by those seeking help for mental issues.

Access to the well is a short walk of approximately 1km from the village of Rhoscolyn and St Gwenfaen’s Church. The well is still blessed each year on November 4 or Saint Gwenfaen’s Day.

Llanlleiana porcelain



Llanlleiana porcelain
Llanlleiana porcelain

Once the site of a thriving kaolin quarry, the porcelain factory burned down in 1920, leaving a now picturesque ruin. The chimney, which is a little further up the hill, was separated to direct harmful fumes away from work areas.

It sits in a very remote location at the most northerly point in Wales, but because of this it has remained relatively unscathed in the century since its closure, making it a unique site to visit during any trip to Anglesey. It can be reached by a nearby footpath or by a coastal walk from St. Patrick’s Church to the west.

Aberlleiniog Castle



Aberlleiniog Castle
Aberlleiniog Castle

Of the many popular and well-known castles in North Wales, there are several that are more often overlooked, such as Castell Aberlleiniog. A short drive from the much more popular Beaumaris Castle, Aberlleiniog is an 11th-century motte hidden in the woods overlooking the Menai Strait, one of the biggest pluses – it’s totally free to visit.

What remains today is not the original Norman wooden structure, which was replaced in the early 17th century. The view requires an easy 20 minute walk to get there, but it’s worth visiting one of the rarely visited castles.

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